4. that there are significant differences found

4. Farkhondeh, Nasser and Pouladi (2017) examined the Effectiveness of positive thinking on reducing conflict and increasing happiness and sense of self-efficacy in high school students. The aim of this study is to reduce conflict and increase the effectiveness of positive thinking, happiness and a sense of self-efficacy in Choram city high school students. This study is quasi-experimental with pre-test and post-test. The study sample consisted of all high school students in Choram city. The sample consisted of 60 patients that were obtained through simple random sampling. The data collected in this study, Yang and happiness Argyle initial questionnaire schema and feel Scherer is self. Results suggested that the experimental and control groups in at least one of the variables conflict, happiness and a sense of self-efficacy, there is a significant difference. In other words they say that Positive thinking training to reduce conflict and increase the happiness and sense of self efficacy. Average score inconsistencies in the experimental group subjects (Subjects taught positive thinking) is significantly less than subjects in the control group, so they say that positive thinking training to reduce inconsistencies in the experimental group compared with the control group. The average happiness score in the experimental group subjects (participants trained Positive Thinking) was significantly higher than subjects in the control group, so they say that positive thinking training increased the happiness in the experimental group compared with the control group. The mean score of self-efficacy Subjects in the experimental group (Subjects taught positive thinking) is significantly higher than subjects in the control group, so they say that positive thinking training increased efficacy in subjects in the experimental group Compared with the control group. Incompatibility between happiness and self-efficacy in terms of gender difference is not significant.5. Gouri (2017) examined the Study habit of high and low achiever. The present study aims to find out the difference between study habits of high achiever and low achiever. The sample of the study consisted of 80 students of class 11th (40high achiever, 40low achiever) of the age group 16 to 18 years belonging to English medium schools of Raipur city, Chhattisgarh. Study Habit Inventory constructed by Mukhopadhyaya and Sansanwal (1985) was administered to the selected sample to assess their study habits. The data was analyzed statistically by employing mean, SD and t-test. Results suggested that there are significant differences found in study behavior (i.e. comprehension, study sets, interaction, drilling, recording and language) of high and low achiever.6. Hartman, Waseeleski and whatley (2017) studied The Effects of Emotional Dysregulation and Testanxiety on GPA. The present study used the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS; Gratz & Roemer, 2004), the Cognitive Test Anxiety Scale (Cassady & Johnson, 2002), and self-reported Grade Point Average (GPA) to determine the relationship between emotional dysregulation, test anxiety, and the effects on academic performance. The present study reported that emotional dysregulation was predictive of cognitive test anxiety scores and test anxiety was not related to GPA. However, one subscale of the DERS, Strategies, was inversely related to GPA. 7. Hui (2017) examined deep breathing reduces state anxiety and enhances test performance through regulating test cognitions in children. A pre-test/post-test, intervention-versus-control experimental design was used to examine the effects, mechanisms and moderators of deep breathing on state anxiety and test performance in 122 Primary students. Taking deep breaths before a timed math test significantly reduced self-reported feelings of anxiety and improved test performance. There was a statistical trend towards greater effectiveness in reducing state anxiety for boys compared to girls, and in enhancing test performance for students with higher autonomic reactivity in test-like situations. The latter moderation was significant when comparing high-versus-low autonomic reactivity groups. Mediation analyses reported that deep breathing reduces state anxiety in test-like situations, creating a better state-of-mind by enhancing the regulation of adaptive-maladaptive thoughts during the test, allowing for better performance. The quick and simple technique can be easily learnt and effectively applied by most children to immediately alleviate some of the adverse effects of test anxiety on psychological well-being and academic performance.

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